THE ROYAL IRISH ACADEMY IS IRELAND'S LEADING BODY OF EXPERTS IN THE SCIENCES AND HUMANITIES

Ireland 1922: Independence, Partition, Civil War

by  Darragh GannonFearghal McGarry
€ 30.00

Book Details

Published by Royal Irish Academy

January 2022

HB

Number of pages: 378

ISBN: 9781911479796

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Coming on New Year's Day, 1 January 2022. You can pre-order your copy now.

Fifty essays. Fifty contributors. One extraordinary year.

From the handover of Dublin Castle, to the dawning of a new border across the island, to the fateful divisions of the civil war, Ireland 1922 provides a snapshot of a year of turmoil, tragedy and, amidst it all, state-building as the Irish revolution drew to a close.

Leading international scholars from different disciplines explore a turning point in Irish history; one whose legacy remains controversial a century on.

If you missed our event 'Ireland 1922: Women in Independence, Debate and Civil war' as part of Dublin Book Festival, you can watch it here below.

About the authors

Darragh Gannon

Darragh Gannon is AHRC research fellow at Queen’s University Belfast and ICUF Beacon fellow at the University of Toronto. He has published widely on the Irish diaspora and the Irish Revolution, including Proclaiming a republic: Ireland, 1916 and the National Collection (Irish Academic Press, 2016) and Conflict, diaspora, and empire: Irish nationalism in Great Britain, 1912–1922 (Cambridge University Press, 2021). He is currently completing a monograph entitled Worlds of revolution: Ireland’s ‘global moment’, 1919–1923.

Fearghal McGarry

Fearghal McGarry is professor of Modern Irish History at Queen’s University Belfast and a member of the Royal Irish Academy. His books include The Abbey rebels of 1916: a lost revolution (Gill and Macmillan, 2015) and The Rising. Ireland. Easter 1916 (Oxford University Press, 2016). He recently led the major AHRC project, A Global History of Irish Revolution, 1916–23. His next book will explore anxieties about modernity in interwar Ireland.
Photo © Lee Pellegrini