THE ROYAL IRISH ACADEMY IS IRELAND'S LEADING BODY OF EXPERTS IN THE SCIENCES AND HUMANITIES

The Royal Irish Academy/Acadamh Ríoga na hÉireann champions research. We identify and recognise Ireland’s world class researchers. We support scholarship and promote awareness of how science and the humanities enrich our lives and benefit society. We believe that good research needs to be promoted, sustained and communicated. The Academy is run by a Council of its members. Membership is by election and considered the highest academic honour in Ireland.

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Orla Lynch

UCC

Dr Orla Lynch is the Head of Criminology at University College Cork. Until 2015 she was Director of Teaching with CSTPV and a Lecturer in Terrorism Studies at the University of St Andrews, Scotland. Orla’s background is in International Security Studies and Applied Psychology; her primary training is as a social psychologist. She studied at both the University of St Andrews (MLitt) and University College Cork (BSc/PhD). Orla currently holds fellowships with Hedayah (Abu Dhabi) and the USAID Resolve Network, she is also a board member of RAN (DG Home), Europe.  Orla was the principal investigator on a two multisite EU funded projects from 2011-2016 that looked at the role of victims and former perpetrators of political violence in ongoing peace initiatives. To date she has secured €1.4 million in EU research funding, and over two hundred thousand in IRCHSS, SRF, Focus Ireland, Globsec and Enterprise Ireland funding. Currently, Orla’s research interests relate to individual and group desistance from political violence, including issues related to deradicalisation, the role of grand narratives in justifying involvement in violence and psychosocial understandings of the transitions from violence to peace. She is currently Irish lead on a Globsec funded project that examines the relationship between (non-political) crime and terrorism. Her most recent book (2018) with Wiley is entitled Applying Psychology. The case of terrorism and political violence.

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