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Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy Volume 112, 2012 (Print Copy)

by Elizabeth FitzPatrick
€ 35.00

Journal Details

Published date

28 December 2015

Frequency: 1 Annually

ISSN: 0035-8991

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Edited by: Elizabeth Fitzpatrick and James Kelly

Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy is a peer-reviewed journal which publishes original research papers primarily in the fields of archaeology and history, but also welcomes submissions on aspects of culture, including material culture, from the perspectives of other disciplines, as well as submissions in Celtic Studies and literature.

Earlier issues, along with the most recent issue, are available in print form exclusively here on our website or by subscription to JSTOR, and can be viewed there. Online copies are also available by subscription to JSTOR.

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CONTENTS

  1. Editorial: 'The "True", the "Beautiful" and the "Old"' (pp. vii-xi)

    Elizabeth FitzPatrick

  2. New dates from the north and a proposed chronology for Irish court tombs (pp. 1-60)

    Rick J. Schulting, Eileen Murphy, Carleton Jones and Graeme Warren

  3. A neo-Assyrian relief in the Weingreen Museum of Biblical Antiquities, Trinity College Dublin—a case study in artefact acquisition (pp. 61-93)

    Amanda Kelly

  4. Doonloughan: a seasonal settlement site on the Connemara coast (pp. 95-146)

    Emily Murray, Finbar McCormick, Conor Newman, Sheila Hamilton-Dyer and Gill Plunkett

  5. St Fursa, the genealogy of an Irish saint—the historical person and his cult (pp. 147-187)

    Stefanie Hamann

  6. Landscape and lamentation: constructing commemorated space in three Middle Irish texts (pp. 189-217)

    Joanna Huckins MacGugan

  7. An Irish Jerusalem in Franconia: the Abbey of the Holy Cross and Holy Sepulchre at Eichstätt (pp. 219-270)

    Diarmuid Ó Riain

  8. Erenachs, erenachships and church landholding in Gaelic Fermanagh, 1270-1609 (pp. 271-300)

    Ciaran Ó Scea

  9. Improving landlords and planned settlements in eighteenth-century Ireland: William Burton Conyngham and the fishing station on Inis Mhic an Doirn, Co. Donegal (pp. 301-332)

    Wes Forsythe

  10. The parallel lives of Joseph Allen Galbraith (1818—90) and Samuel Haughton (1821-97): religion, friendship, scholarship and politics in Victorian Ireland (pp. 333-359)

    Miguel DeArce

  11. In Retrospect: A centennial look at Thomas J. Westropp's field records of the promontory forts of north County Mayo (pp. 361-372)

    Claire Cotter

About the author

Elizabeth FitzPatrick

Elizabeth FitzPatrick is a personal professor in archaeology at the School of Geography and Archaeology, NUI Galway, a director of the Discovery Programme and a fellow of the Royal Society of Antiquaries. Her research and publications concern topographies of power, place-making, landscape and settlement, and concepts of territory, among medieval Gaelic peoples. She has a particular interest in knowledge that can be acquired at the interface of disciplines. Professor FitzPatrick also leads cross-disciplinary publication projects important to Irish identity and cultural life, among them the RIA thematic volumes (with J. Kelly) on Food and drink in Ireland 2016, and Domestic life in Ireland 2011. She was archaeology editor of Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy Section C, 2007-15.