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Foclóir Stairiúil na Gaeilge

The Academy’s Foclóir Stairiúil na Gaeilge is currently working on its Corpas na Gaeilge 1882-1926. As part of this work and to celebrate 1916 they are digitising Irisleabhar na Gaedhilge (1-19) in recognition of the authors, some of whom took part in the Easter Rising of 1916, and to all of the people who kept this journal alive in the revival era.

This material is now available here.

Irisleabhar na Gaedhilge was published regularly between 1882 and 1909. It was an important periodical for the Irish language revival community in the time before the foundation of the Irish Free State. The journal was founded by Aondacht na Gaedhilge, an organisation founded in 1880. Among the writers who wrote for the journal were Pádraig Mac Piarais (editor 1903-1909), Eoghan Ó Gramhnaigh and Eoin Mac Néill. Maxwell Close and Norma Northwick also had connections with the journal.

As part of the work on periodicals for inclusion in Corpas na Gaeilge 1882-1926 which is being prepared by Foclóir Stairiúil na Gaeilge in the Royal Irish Academy at the moment, all of the volumes of Irisleabhar na Gaedhilge (1-19) are being digitised and words and samples will be used from them in the drafting of Foclóir Stairiúil na Gaeilge. In order to give due recognition to the authors, some of whom took part in the Easter Rising of 1916, and to all of the people who kept this journal alive in the revival era, it is our aim to make Irisleabhar na Gaedhilge available online as a searchable corpus before Easter 2016. As well as the value in preserving this material in digital form, the material will be of value to researchers – historians, linguists and the Irish language community in general.

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