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Irish Historic Towns Atlas Seminar

Town and Country: Perspectives from the Irish Historic Towns Atlas, 6 May to 27 May 2021

IHTA Seminar 2021

'Town and Country: perspectives from the Irish Historic Towns Atlas' took place online over four Thursdays in May. 

With some notable exceptions, the historic relationships between urban centres in Ireland and their rural hinterlands have received surprisingly little attention. Towns and the countryside have long been viewed as entirely separate entities having little in common with one another. As centres of administration, education, entertainment, finance, healthcare, industry, justice, religion and trade, towns had to be supplied and sustained by a variety of hinterlands providing food, fuel, labour, raw materials and customers for craft goods and imported wares. The 2021 IHTA seminar will explore the nature and evolution of town–country relationships in Ireland through the ages, a field just now beginning to receive the attention it deserves. Convened by the Irish Historic Towns Atlas in collaboration with the British Historic Towns Atlas/Historic Towns Trust and Dublin City Council. Royal Irish Academy #IHTA2021 #TownandCountry

Click here for full programme

Seminar series programme
Date Session Speakers Link
6.5.2021 'Monastic tenants, Viking raiders and Hiberno-Norse townspeople' Howard Clarke and Ruth Johnson watch here
13.5.2021 'Town and country in later medieval Ireland' Michael Potterton, Jim Galloway and Margaret Murphy watch here
20.5.2021 'Lawyers, merchants and peasants: town and country interaction in early modern Ireland' Raymond Gillespie and Brendan Scott watch here
27.5.2021 'From outlying villages to townships: Dublin suburbs in the nineteenth century' Ruth McManus, Séamas Ó Maitiú, Frank Cullen, introduced by Colm Lennon watch here
27.5.2021 ‘Medieval towns: Why we need to take account of the country’ Chris Dyer, chaired by Keith Lilley watch here


IHTA Seminar 2019: Seascapes and Townscapes — Ports and the Nineteenth-Century City

The 2019 IHTA Seminar took place in Dublin Port Company HQ and the Royal Irish Academy on 16 and 17 May 2019 and was convened by the Irish Historic Towns Atlas (IHTA) in collaboration with the British Historic Towns Atlas/Historic Towns Trust (HTT) and the Royal Irish Academy and in association with Dublin Port Company. 

'Where townscapes meet seascapes, ports are a significant feature of our nineteenth-century urban inheritance. The topographic, environmental and cartographic impacts of ‘the port’ on urban landscapes is well represented in the Irish Historic Towns Atlas series, as exemplified by the IHTA published fascicles and volumes, for Dublin, Belfast, Derry~Londonderry, Drogheda, Dundalk, Galway, Limerick, Sligo and Youghal, as well as in preparation, as in the case of Cork, Dungarvan and New Ross.

The 2019 annual seminar of the Irish Historic Towns Atlas explored the evolution of port functions, infrastructures and topography on the island of Ireland, as well as its associations with the broader nineteenth-century urban experience, in Britain and in Europe, since ports function as the gateways connecting Irish towns and cities with wider urban worlds.

@IHTA_RIA

#IHTA2019 

Image details: ‘Survey of Dublin Bay and the adjacent banks’ by William Mudge and G.A. Frazer, 1828. Admiralty Chart 043 Dublin Bay, courtesy the Map Library, Trinity College Library Dublin.

IHTA Seminar 2018 report

'Modernising townscapes: urban evolution in Ireland and Great Britain from the Reformation to industrialisation, 1540–1840'

Last year's IHTA Seminar took place on Friday 18 May 2018. There was also be a public lecture to open the seminar on Thursday 17 May 2018 by Professor Roey Sweet (University of Leicester), both in Academy House. 

The 2018 annual seminar of the Irish Historic Towns Atlas (IHTA) was being convened in collaboration with the British Historic Towns Atlas/Historic Towns Trust (HTT) and explored the similarities and differences to be found in the urban landscapes of our two neighbouring islands, reflecting on their shared and connected histories, as well as on the common purposes of the two atlas projects. Focusing on 'Modernising Townscapes', the seminar compared towns and cities of both Ireland and Britain through time. The aim was to explore urban evolution in Ireland and Britain from the Reformation to Industrialisation (1540–1840) and examined how, despite close geographical proximity, local factors and influences were important in shaping urban landscapes across the two islands as much as wider common structures and proceses, such as religion, warfare, defence, lordship and commerce. 

FINAL PROGRAMME

Contributors to More maps and texts: sources and the Irish Historic Towns Atlas edited by H.B. Clarke and Sarah Gearty, launched by Keith Lilley at the end of the IHTA seminar 2018. 

IHTA Seminar 2017 Report

Last year's IHTA Seminar took place on 19 May 2017. There was also a public lecture to open the seminar on Thursday 18 May, both in Academy House. 

Public Lecture

Howard Clarke, chair, with Roger Kain and Keith Lilley who responded to the lecutre

'Mapping towns through time' was delivered by Professor Roger J.P. Kain, School of Advanced Study, University of London. He is a leading cartographic historian and has published thirteen books on maps including most recently, British town maps: a history.

Anngret Simms asks a question to Roger Kain on his lecture

IHTA Seminar 2017

Sarah Gearty delivering her paper in the Cartographic Connections session

This year's theme was 'Mapping townscapes: comparative perspectives through the Irish and British historic towns atlases'. Speakers included Arnold Horner, Jacinta Prunty, Nick Millea, Giles Darkes, Keith Lilley, Sarah Gearty and Rachel Murphy. There was also an international panel discussion with Colin Bray (OSI), Eamonn Doyle (ESRI), Daniel Stracke (Institute for Comparative Urban History, Germany) and Anngret Simms (European Historic Towns Atlas). The seminar was kindly supported by the Irihs Walled Towns Network. 

 

Nick Millea during his paper in the Cartographic Contexts session

Pleanary session with Daniel Stracke (Institute for Comparative Urban History, Münster), Colin Bray (OSi), Eamonn Doyle (Esri Ireland), Anngret Simms (European Historic Atlas Project) and Keith Lilley (chair, HTT)

Members of the Irish and British Historic Towns Atlas teams

For the full programme please click here

IHTA Seminar 2016 Report

The 2016 annual seminar of the Irish Historic Towns Atlas (IHTA) was convened in collaboration with the British Historic Towns Atlas/Historic Towns Trust (HTT) and explored the similarities and differences to be found in the urban landscapes of our two neighbouring islands, reflecting on their shared and connected histories, as well as on the common purposes of the two atlas projects. Focusing on 'medieval townscapes', the 2016 seminar compared towns and cities of both Ireland and Britain using a thematic structure to consider how, despite the close geographical proximity of Ireland and Britain, their urban landscapes in the Middle Ages were shaped as much by local factors and influences as they were by common structures and concerns, such as religion, warfare, defence, lordship and commerce. 

The seminar took place in Academy House, 19 Dawson Street, Dublin 2 on Friday, 20 May 2016

Comparisons were made with Bristol and Galway; Kilkenny and Norwich; Limerick and York; Caernarfon and New Ross; London and Dublin.

The plenary session was delivered by Terry Slater (University of Birmingham): 'Comparing medieval towns in Britain and Ireland: a plan-analytical approach using the historic towns atlases'. 

Full programme available here.

Image: Portolan chart extract by Albino de Canepa 1489 (c) James Ford Bell Library, University of Minnesota

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